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Over the years I’ve recorded many sounds in different locations around the world. This collection of recordings aims to highlight the unique ‘voices of a place’.

Recorded early morning as the sun rose. Not many people around, the small squat fishermen huts still boarded, a few fishing boats bobbed lightly at their moorings. There was simply the sound of the breeze playing through the rushes behind me, the chirruping of sparrows among the fields and eucalyptus, and the sea, gloriously flat calm and crystal clear as it lapped lightly against the sand. I sat there seemingly with the world to myself and as the light strengthened, promising another tremendously hot summers day, the Isle of Gozo began to shimmer on the horizon in an indistinct blur of colours, creamy pink cliffs, grey smudges of olive trees and yellow church steeples. Eventually an elderly man came and sat by the shore and working delicately with reeds and twine, he shaped an oval basket for octopus.

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6 comments on “Malta – Gnejna bay early morning seascape

  1. Have you read ‘In pursuit of silence’ by George Prochnik? At one point in the book he mentions someone who recorded the sounds of different cities. I will try to find the passage and give you the reference if you haven’t read the book.

    1. timlewis77 says:

      Yes please that would be brilliant. I’ve been reading a few of the notables recently – Bernie Krause and Trevor Cox

  2. Page 109-110 The pursuit of Silence

    At a meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1931, Dr. William Braid White, director of research and acoustics for the American Steel and Wire Company, created a nationwide stir when he proposed that the roar of cities actually had a musical undertone.
    Dr. White encouraged every member
    of his audience to go to the twentieth story of a New York skyscraper, open a window, and lean out.

    “Let him then listen carefully to the noises that float up to him from the street below,”Dr. White instructed.”After a while he will notice that the crashes, bangs, and clatters that, upon the street level, come as a succession of shattering blows upon his ears, now begin to blend into a single continuous roar…

    …Every city in the world, Dr. White claimed, has its own special ground tone. Chicago, for example, though filled with people who are just as noisy as New Yorkers, seemed to Dr. White “more lighthearted.”

    Though the Loop was”crowded to suffocation,”the lake acted as a damper – all the more necessary because the streetcars were noisier and the sound of the elevated”far more pervasive.”

    All in all, Dr. White was inclined to place Chicago’s ground tone at E flat.

    London, on the other hand, had “a heavy hum”close to the lowest C, because it was a city of “low
    buildings, wood paving blocks, moist atmosphere”- and a “lawabiding population”not prone”to displays of excessive excitement.”

    Dr. White confessed that his discovery might not carry overwhelming scientific relevance, but he contended that if we listen for the particular character of music made by our respective blendered city noises, we might achieve insights into both theinnate psychologies and environmental influences acting upon residents. There were also, he implied, benefits for the listener: all you need is a little distance in order to begin receiving something of the concertgoer’s pleasure from an experience of sound that might otherwise strike the ears simply as noxious clamor”

    OCR’d with CamScanner

    1. timlewis77 says:

      London on the other hand had a “law abiding population”not prone”to displays of excessive excitement.” Love it. Great quotes and very true.Every place has a particular sound, a personality…be it Paris or Lima.

  3. Paul Darter says:

    Makes a welcome contrast withe sounds of the Heathrow flight path

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